Interview with 30P Gaming

Andrew Holt-Kentwell speaks to the recently formed Swedish side 30P Gaming ahead of their first tournament as a team – on home soil no less – which will take place in March.

After a decent performance by Blight Gaming at DSRack #3 in Copenhagen earlier this year the announcement of 30P’s new Counter-Strike source team might’ve have come as a surprise to some. Clearly the chemistry in the team drove the Swedes far in the tournament, spurred on by the hilarious cheers and jeers of Christoffer “Helblinde” Nilsson across the row of BENQ computers.

Adastra, Berlin Allianz and Vitriolic flavour the background and experience of this new 30P roster, sprinkled with a generous helping of new and upcoming talent.


Friberg and Helblinde at DSRack #3, Copenhagen.

Now living in Dublin, Ireland together – save for Oscar ‘XperteN’ Westling who remains in Sweden – the guys sat down together for this interview to talk about the importance of team chemistry and the outlook for 2011.

So guys, thanks for taking the time to speak to Cadred. First up, where are you guys doing this interview from?

Well we are actually hiring a house in Ireland right now, mainly because Fifflaren decided it would be a good idea to force everyone to come over. Me and haunted just arrived today after the worst travelling experience ever. Also we didn’t even receive our luggage yet. Anyways it’s good to be here with everyone and we are all looking forward to starting the new year with a bang.

Some of the most reputable and best funded organisations offer a similar setup for their teams – how advantageous do you think it is to be sharing a house as a CS:S team?

Fifflaren:

I think it’s a good opportunity, because it’s much easier to communicate and go through things together. Surely the team chemistry will improve as well! Another thing that’s good is that we can abuse friberg in real life, and teach him how to play on LAN.

Helblinde:

I fully agree, doing this will also add some extra motivation to the team that I’m sure we will need. We are all old as the street after all.

Friberg:

I think it will be a valuable experience for me to play with so experienced players, especially Helblinde. He is really good with the AWP!!

Player chemistry is obviously key to a successful team and I thought at DSRack the spirit some of you guys showed as part of the Blight lineup took you a long way. Just how essential is that team spirit for you guys as a Swedish lineup going into the 30P LAN in March?

Helblinde:

team spirit for me is personally one of the most important factors. I haven’t really enjoyed the game at all for the last year or so, and I’m only still playing because of these guys. We are all good friends in general so I will be looking foward to competing with these guys.

Friberg joins Xperten for some shoutcasting at DSRack #3, Copenhagen.

Haunted:

It is very good that we are this close to each other, because then it will be easy to tackle difficult situations that can occur on lan. If someone gets sad we know how to cheer him up, and if someone gets mad, it’s not that bad.

How do you feel that team chemistry has developed in the actual game? Are you seeing positive results?

Haunted:

We all know that we are really bad online, and it’s a different ball game on LAN. We tend to get “the pitt” as we call it in swedish, but as long as we do the rounds correctly we are all in good spirits.

Helblinde:

As Ted said, winning online rarely happens to us. I remember back in vitriolic when we boot camped before TeX and lost every single game we played before the lan, we even thought we were gonna go out in the groups. Not all that surprisingly teams that have beaten us online with 26-4 went out early in the tourney.

Fifflaren:

But yeah going back to the original question, we are seeing good results thanks to our chemistry. I’m sure they will be even better when the time comes to compete offline.

What is it that still drives you guys to compete in this game at this level – on an individual level, and a team level? Helblinde mentioned he’s only still playing for that team spirit, but what really connects you with this game?

All:

The passion to compete, it’s just that simple. If we were good at something else I’m sure we would have tried to compete in that instead, but unfortunately we suck at everything else. It’s still fun to attend events and meet all the players, play close games (and win) and all the stuff that’s related. That’s why we all still play the game.

Fifflaren playing for Berlin Allianz, CGS Season 1.

2010 was seen by many as a revival year for CS:S and most of you have been around Source longer than the average person – do you think that’s a load of bullshit or do you really see things getting brighter for the game?

Helblinde:

Personally I’m very happy that more and more events are starting to pop up, if it keeps up we might even see teams like the previous reason-gaming coming back (and who wouldn’t want that?) The actual scene though is still acting like a bunch of 12 year olds, crying over such a thing as a removed map. It was a disgrace to read.

Friberg:

More and more lans, including teams from all around the world traveling to these events. It’s a good thing, and hopefully we will see bigger events picking up source during 2011.


And on that note: rumours are starting to appear stating IEM 2011 and beyond could see CS:S featured. Can you put into words what exactly that would mean for the scene, and how it would have to react?

All:

It would elevate CSS to something completely dfferent, it would be able to compete with 1.6 when it comes to being picked for huge events. This would attract more players, and the community would grow stronger. The scene itself will be forced to stop living in the past, and push forward instead. If this happened I’m sure we would be more motivated to play, and could possibly reach a higher level.

Friberg: on several occasions you’ve been referred to as the Swedish “up-and-comer” in the game. How easy have you found it to slot into this lineup of individuals particularly, and how easy do you think it is to break into the game nowdays?

Friberg:

It is much easier to play with people that you bond with in real life, it also adds to the fun factor even outside of the game. To break into the game you need to be able to do many things, not just aim and make headshots. Lan experience is very valuable and also playing with players who can actually teach you something. Just playing online won’t make you good enough to play in a good team.

Christoffer “Helblinde” Nilsson playing for the Swedish giants Vitriolic.

What goes up must come down. What in your eyes is the key to toppling such a dominant team like Verygames?

All:

Playing enough, it’s all about that really. They spend alot of time doing things that no other teams care to do, that’s why they are the best, and that’s why they will keep winning until someone decides that they want to change things around.

I’m sure you guys have been following the TTL (Time Travel LAN) – were you surprised to see Volt Gaming there and not a team like Vitriolic?

Helblinde:

I would have put Adastra there instead really, they did so much to the scene back in the days that I missed. Vitriolic only lasted for 2 events so, not much to go with there really.

Who’s gonna win it, Salvo or VG 2008?

All:

It’s hard to say considering they were two different teams from different times, back then it would be even, but today? VG would win it.

(Friberg is nodding furiously)

Finally, are you guys bringing sexy Counter-Strike back to Sweden?

Not only that, we will bring sexy wrestling as well: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gFZX2YAVhgc

Guys, thank you kindly for joining me tonight and taking the time to answer some questions. Any last words?

We would like to thank 30P and all of our sponsors for the support, de_train is a great map, and Ireland is such a weird country. See you on the battlefield boys!

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